Author Archives: Graeme Armstrong

Graeme Armstrong

About Graeme Armstrong

Graeme Armstrong is a Relate Counsellor and Clinical supervisor. He also works in private practice. He delivers counselling for relationships in Mea House, Felling Children's Centre and two GP surgeries in the Newcastle area. He also works with clients experiencing depression, anxiety and loss. He is currently in the 2nd year of an MSc in Mindfulness through Aberdeen University, studying at Samye Ling Tibetan Monastery in Scotland.

Mindfulness Based Living Course in Whitley Bay

Dear All,

We have pleasure in letting you know about this Mindfulness Based living Course.

This is a mindfulness course developed and pioneered by the Mindfulness Association and it is the first time it has been delivered in this area

Rachel Jones-Wild & Graeme Armstrong

8-week course starts Thursday 24th January 2013 6.15pm-8.30pm

Full day Saturday 23rd March 2013 10am-4pm

Course costs: £200 for 8 week course

We meet at: Azure Therapy Arcade House Whitley Bay NE26 2TE

Contact: Rachel Jones-Wild Rachel@azuretherapy.com 07939 003381

Graeme Armstrong spirit.home@virgin.net 07885 640 490

Mindfulness is…

Mindfulness means paying attention in a particular way, on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally. During mindful practice we become more aware of the way our minds spend large amounts of their waking time simply distracted and often regretful about the past or anxious about the future, missing the very moments that are really all we have. Mindfulness takes us out of any inner story we might have created and are caught up in and brings us into a fresh intimacy with our actual experience in an unconditioned way.

The course offers participants an insight into how mindfulness can enrich their lives. It is an experiential course that requires commitment from participants to understand and embody its simplicity and effectiveness. Through regular guided practice participants bring mindfulness and compassion into everyday living.

Course facilitators

Graeme Armstrong is a Relate Counsellor and Clinical supervisor and has worked privately as a counsellor since 1998. He delivers counselling for relationships in Mea House, Chowdene Children’s Centre and in Primary Care. He also works with clients experiencing depression, anxiety and loss. He is currently in the 2nd year of an MSc in Mindfulness through Aberdeen University, studying at Samye Ling Tibetan Centre in Scotland.

Rachel Jones-Wild is a mindfulness trainer and integrative counsellor. With over five years experience in teaching meditation, and professional training with Breathworks in mindfulness-based interventions, I run group sessions on increasing awareness and relaxation to reduce stress and work with difficult emotion. These are suitable for any level of experience. Through developing greater awareness we can live richer, more vibrant lives, whatever our circumstances.

Presentation: Mindfulness: nowhere to go, nothing to do, nothing to change

Image courtesy of hurleygurley

Mindfulness is said to be the very heart of Buddhist meditation, yet in essence it has very little to do with any kind of religion at all, and is used by scientists, engineers, artists and therapists of all persuasions.

Mindfulness means paying attention in a particular way, on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally. During mindful practice we become more aware of the way our minds spend large amounts of their waking time simply distracted and often regretful about the past or anxious about the future, missing the very moments that are really all we have.

Mindfulness takes us out of any inner story we might have created and are caught up in and brings us into a fresh intimacy with our actual experience in an unconditioned way.

All these practices are not just in-the-moment practices though. You’ll see above the word “non-judgmentally” is used deliberately in the definition, and part of mindful practice is to bring a sense of non-judgment, a sense of compassion and loving kindness to self, to friends and to the world at large.

We become kinder to our bodies, our minds, we become more empathetic, considerate people; we take time and we have time, for we learn to truly savour the moments we live.

in this experiential workshop we will be using breathwork, sitting practice and visualisation to

  • explore how it is to sit with our thoughts and feelings
  • experience the sense of distracted mind
  • learn how we relate to our inner stories about ourselves
  • tentatively learn what conditions we might create to become more compassionately intimate with ourselves

Mindfulness: it’s not what you think